mmerriam: (Oney)
Another not very good week for working on the novel. I need to figure out some kind of writing schedule, but my personal life seems to be in such a constant state of changing gears that I can't find stability in the chaos to work. I'm too tired after work. Weekends are always packed. My two days off seem to evaporate in housework and daily minutia.

It's starting to drive me a little nuts. I get a little nuts when I'm not writing. Maybe more than a little nuts.

Went to the Pratt Community Ice Cream Social last Friday. I did not climb the Witch's Tower water tower, instead hanging out in the park while the rest of my crew climbed up to the observation deck. I found myself having interesting conversation with charming strangers who would come and share the picnic table I was at. Saturday we the first production meeting for the Minnesota Fringe Festival show I'm going to be in this year. We are rolling along, and I expect we shall have a read-through of our stories pretty soon.

1. 1700 words written.
2. Went back and added to a couple of scenes in the 1979 section.
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Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
Another week of poor writing metrics. I am hopeful things are turning around now that I've figured out why I had stalled. I didn't get as much writing done as I would have liked over the holiday weekend, but sometimes that's just the way life goes.

1. Wrote about 1700 words.
2. Untangled a plot knot.
3. Made a realization about one of my characters.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
So. Minnesota Fringe Festival. That's a thing I'm going to be in again this year. The "Invisible People" show I'm part of came in off the waitlist. "Invisible People" as in people other people like to pretend don't exist. Like, you know, gimps like me. I am thrilled and a little scared.

My acoustic bass has picked up a nasty buzzing noise. I'm going to have to get it looked at by a real luthier, when I have some spare cash. In the meantime, I'll get the electric bass back out of the closet.

Finished reading the entire Randell Garrett "Lord Darcy" set of stories and novel. Enjoyed it a lot. Also went to see Walking Shadow Theatre Company's adaptation of The Three Muskateers. It was great rollicking fun and still has a week left in the run. Go see it!

Not much writing this week. A little over 1000 words. I can remember a time when I wrote that many words in a day. Still, forward movement is forward movement.

1. Wrote 1100 words
2. Made a 1920s music playlist
3. Worked on the notes I collected from the Oney Facebook Community.
4. Outlined most of the rest of the 1929 section.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
I managed to get some pretty good writing done this week, most of it in coffee shops while waiting to be at other events. I spent a lot of my week dealing with my previous post about Convergence, but at least the conversation about the convention was civil. I also had the pleasure to moderate the panel "Adapting Fiction for Stage," for the Minnesota Speculative Fiction Writers.

1. Wrote about 2200 words on the novel
2. Did some research in books and online
3. Posted a question to the Oney Facebook Community, got several good answers
4. Realized I may have a plot problem. Started working to resolve it.
5. Reread everything I've written so far.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
This week was a strange and odd week for writing. I didn't get as much done as I thought I might, since I decided to go on the spring camping trip a friend of mine organizes. It was the first camping trip I'd been on in about 10 years, and I had a really good time. I even wrote at the camp! Yeah, things are moving slowly, perhaps too slowly, but I don't care. The project will get done when the project gets done, and I refuse to hurry the process.

It's not like I'm under contract and have a looming deadline, after all. If I want to take an entire year to write the first draft, that's my business. I have other project in the pipeline, things in the beta-process-heading-to-writers-group-soon-I-hope stuff. Plus, I'm about to take on another anthology project for MinnSpec.

1. Wrote about 1750 words.
2. Made about 800 words worth of notes and outlining.
3. Thought reallyreally hard about…stuff…
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
While the word count this week isn’t large, I still made strong forward progress with all the outlining and brainstorming and research. That I began the writing in the 1929 section at all is a win for me this week, since I am working with an almost entirely new cast of characters.

Most of this week’s new words were written at Butter Bakery and Café while hanging out with of writers. The hardest thing has been finding the right voice for this section. At the moment it seems to want to be written in a remote, almost dream-like style of prose. Whatever works.

I may not have anything to post next week, unfortunately. Life is being life and sometimes you have to deal with those life distractions and obligations even when all you want to do is write.

1. Wrote 1,015 new words
2. Researched clothing and living in late 1920s rural Oklahoma
3. Made more outline notes for the 1929 section
4. Studied more of my Oney: A Community History book
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Old Lynx)
I had a pretty good Minicon this year. The two panels I was on were well attended and had both excellent panelists and thoughtful audiences. I played music three nights in a row, which was a little tough on my hands, but worth it. My reading was reasonably well attended and I sold a few books and signed a few more.

10277096_10152328791850138_7346936324522975136_n
*Photo courtesy of Baron Dave Romm

The three panels I attended were pretty good as well, though I had to sit on my hands and bit my tongue a couple times at the first one. I only made it to one reading this year, Cat Valente's, but I loved her story and reading-style. Made friends with some visiting musicians and got to help take them out for Malaysian food. On Saturday, three different people gave me three different types of cupcakes. It is a mystery as to why this happened, but I am not complaining. I mean, cupcakes!

But mostly what made it a great convention was hanging out with people--too many to name here--but Minicon felt more like a family reunion this year, maybe because I learned how to make my own fun at conventions. I am planning to return next year for the 50th Minicon celebration.

I didn't hardly work at all at the convention, which says something about how engaged I was, but I did work a little and even a little more yesterday.

1. Completed the first draft of the 1979 section
2. Added small scenes to the 1979 section to seed other sections
3. Made notes and started outlining 1929 section
4. Search for and added 1920s music to playlist.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
First Draft of the 1979 Section is complete.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
I had a much better writing week. With no conventions, normal work hours, and feeling physically better, I was able to get back on track. I spent a small chunk of Saturday night and Sunday into the mid-afternoon writing, which was nice. Got more work done Monday night than usual. I will probably be done with the first draft of the 1979 timeline before the month of April is out. My teenaged protagonists are all three hip-deep in the mystery and striving with various degrees of success and failure, but lack the understanding, experience and power of their opponents.

1. About 3500 new words
2. Committed research online
3. Messed with the timelines, change 1936 to 1929 and 2000 back to 1999.
4. Started outlining the 1929 section
5. Read more on my Oney Community History Book

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
I almost didn't post this update because, well, I wrote almost nothing last week (330 words). It was kind of a perfect storm disaster of post-Paganicon exhaustion, dealing with being ill while making up my hours at work, and trying to catch up on everything else in life I have fallen behind on. Still, I had hopeful that this week will be better.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
Things have slowed down considerably, to the point of it becoming frustrating for me. It isn't that I'm stuck, or having problems with the story, or am suffering from a lack of enthusiasm: it's that all my time over the last week was sucked up and all my time appears to be sucked up for the next couple of weeks as well, as if I'm living under the pounding brushes of a galactic Hoover.

This sucks

Meager progress is still progress.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
I like creating titles. I do. But I usually don't bother creating titles for chapters in my novels. I just number them, as in the case of Old Blood's Fate or in Last Car to Annwn Station I use a day and date as a countdown. My three completed unpublished novels have followed this format.

But Ghosts of the Places We Live wants something more vibrant. It wants each chapter to have its own title and its own distinct personality. I'm going to tease you a little bit with the tentative chapter titles, even though I still haven't actually written any prose to go with them (don't worry, I have scenes and such for each chapter in my head and plan to start outlining them this week). Some of these many never be used. I may create new titles once the prose is written. But for now, these are the ones I'm working on.

Here, have a taste of what is to come.

"All the Prairie Knows Her Name"
"And None Knew Her to Cry"
"Apparitions of Faded Glory"
"Bereft of Kith, Bound by Kin"
"Dust Bowl Druids of Judgment Day"
"In Hands Softer Than Cotton, We Hold Our Yesterdays"
"Move Along Home, Wandering Son"
"Offerings in Blood and Dust"
"Sleep the Whole Summer Long"
"Sons and Daughters of the Grassy Plains"
"Spectral Letters from a Brass Combination Box"
"The Boy Who Became a Story"
"The Ghostly Dispatch"
"The Girl with the Red-Clay Heart"
"The Heart of the Keystone"
"The Intimacy of Books"
"The King of Crops and the Queen of Dirt"
"The Waitress of the Lake"
"Under Stone We Bury Things Most Dear"
"Waking the Bones of the School"
"Where the Rivers Run Red"

How do you handle chapter titles and headings?

Ghosts Of the Places We Live

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Oney)
I have been preparing to tackle Ghosts of the Places We Live while also working on rewrites for There Are Not Enough Midnights, making notes, considering characters, doing some basic story arch brainstorming, rereading the bits of other dead project I'm planning to strip for parts and work into this story, researching, gathering photo references, and of course creating a musical playlist to write by.

The whole project has me feeling a little daunted. This piece is threatening to be the hardest things I've ever written, both emotionally and in complexity. I'm putting myself under a lot of pressure to get this one right and I'm putting a lot of myself into it.

I've pretty much come to the conclusion that is three different stories woven together.

Story A is set during the 1930s and shows the things that happen to set everything in motion, including the magic called into being. Story B is set in the late 1970s and follows the actions and decisions that cause things to go off the rails. Story C is set in our current time and shows the characters dealing with the consequences of the past and trying to save—or at least salvage—the future.

That I want to write these intertwined stories in different voices and styles makes the project even more intimidating.

And yet, when I look at the rural fantasies I've written before, they have the truest voice of all my work and are some of the strongest bits of writing I've managed to date. I've been moderately successful at interweaving A and B stories in one piece, so adding a C will be a new experience, but not something wildly outside my skills.

I can't help but worry that I will fail the story that wants to be written: that I'm not up to the challenge I see shaping up before me. A part of me wants to pick a different project, something safe and familiar. But then, if I don't take chances, stretch, and risk failure, well, I'm not really growing as an artist, am I?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Originally posted at michaelmerriam.net. You can comment here or there.
mmerriam: (Default)
And tomorrow will be a better day.

It was rough sledding at Merriam Manor today.

[livejournal.com profile] careswen had a terrible migraine last night after class, so she stumbled in and simply tossed her contacts, knowing we had just received a new shipment of contact lens a few days ago. Except I had ordered the wrong prescription, getting "+" contacts instead of "–" contacts. Her glasses are way out-of-date, and she has a final exam tonight. Fortunately, we were able to get her a sample pair of contacts in her strength and brand. New contacts are on order, as are new glasses.

Speaking of [livejournal.com profile] careswen having a final tonight, we are not at 4th Street Fantasy Convention. Yet. We had planned to go to the work party and play reading tonight, but that was before we knew when her final was scheduled. We will probably arrive tomorrow sometime around opening ceremonies.

If you are at the convention, please come up and say hello. I'm the six foot, two inch, 270 pound blind guy with a 58 inch white cane. I may or may not be wearing a patch over my right eye, which is having issues at the moment. I'll be with the cute graduate student.

In other news, Reverend Selena is clingy and full of hairballs. Yeah.
mmerriam: (Default)
And tomorrow will be a better day.

It was rough sledding at Merriam Manor today.

[livejournal.com profile] careswen had a terrible migraine last night after class, so she stumbled in and simply tossed her contacts, knowing we had just received a new shipment of contact lens a few days ago. Except I had ordered the wrong prescription, getting "+" contacts instead of "–" contacts. Her glasses are way out-of-date, and she has a final exam tonight. Fortunately, we were able to get her a sample pair of contacts in her strength and brand. New contacts are on order, as are new glasses.

Speaking of [livejournal.com profile] careswen having a final tonight, we are not at 4th Street Fantasy Convention. Yet. We had planned to go to the work party and play reading tonight, but that was before we knew when her final was scheduled. We will probably arrive tomorrow sometime around opening ceremonies.

If you are at the convention, please come up and say hello. I'm the six foot, two inch, 270 pound blind guy with a 58 inch white cane. I may or may not be wearing a patch over my right eye, which is having issues at the moment. I'll be with the cute graduate student.

In other news, Reverend Selena is clingy and full of hairballs. Yeah.
mmerriam: (Hide)
Spent the morning out pounding the pavement, trying to find part-time employment. Had three good possibilities, all within a mile for the house, for positions as a sales broker, bank teller, and storage clerk. I also applied for a full-time position as a less-than-load and small package traffic manager for a major company. I really only want part-time, but the salary and benefits of this one are simply too enticing to pass up, and I am utterly qualified for the position.

Received my final exam for my short story class. Care to guess what I'll be doing on Monday?

Started preparing for gaming this weekend. I'm stating to get the feel for this setting and my players. It's time to ramp it up a notch or two.

The Reverend Selena remains the fuzziest of the fuzzy, and her bald patches are starting to grow back now that the move and all the attendant chaos it caused are over. However, she's still one of the least graceful cats I've ever met. She attempted the small leap from the table to the window sill, something I've seen her do at least a half-dozen times, and she missed.

Instead she hung by her front claws on the sill for a moment, and then dropped down to the carpet. She gave me that, "I meant to do that" look, then walked away, tail high and swishing. Right now she's repeatedly stalking and killing one of the yarn-mice. Pounce, chew, claw, fling, pounce chew, claw, fling...
mmerriam: (Hide)
Spent the morning out pounding the pavement, trying to find part-time employment. Had three good possibilities, all within a mile for the house, for positions as a sales broker, bank teller, and storage clerk. I also applied for a full-time position as a less-than-load and small package traffic manager for a major company. I really only want part-time, but the salary and benefits of this one are simply too enticing to pass up, and I am utterly qualified for the position.

Received my final exam for my short story class. Care to guess what I'll be doing on Monday?

Started preparing for gaming this weekend. I'm stating to get the feel for this setting and my players. It's time to ramp it up a notch or two.

The Reverend Selena remains the fuzziest of the fuzzy, and her bald patches are starting to grow back now that the move and all the attendant chaos it caused are over. However, she's still one of the least graceful cats I've ever met. She attempted the small leap from the table to the window sill, something I've seen her do at least a half-dozen times, and she missed.

Instead she hung by her front claws on the sill for a moment, and then dropped down to the carpet. She gave me that, "I meant to do that" look, then walked away, tail high and swishing. Right now she's repeatedly stalking and killing one of the yarn-mice. Pounce, chew, claw, fling, pounce chew, claw, fling...
mmerriam: (Michael)
All that is left to wrap up my Analyzing Short Stories class is to take the final. I can't request it until I receive my grade for my last submission, which I sent in about ten days ago. It typically takes about 21 days for my submissions to get back to me, which will leave me a little over three weeks to request and complete the final.

I thought I might start reviewing the stories, just to get ahead a little, but once I began, I realized that every one of these stories had stuck with me to the point that I may not really need to review that much. All of these stories - whether I enjoyed them, hated them, or just felt meh about them - have stuck with me, which was the point.

I am also finding myself nodding and going, "Yes, yes indeed, I get what the writer was trying to say/do/show," and while I may not have enjoyed certain stories, I admire each of them, and I am the better as both a reader and writer for having taken this class. What's more, stories that I did not enjoy - or completely understand at the initial reading - I am now looking back on with fondness and understanding. Several of these stories forced me way outside of my comfort zone, which was exactly what I needed.

For those keeping score at home, of the 135 stories in the anthology (The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction: Ann Charters, editor), I read these 45. At some point I plan to read the rest.

Achebe, Chinua: "Civil Peace"
Allende, Isabel: "And of Clay Are We Are Created"
Anderson, Sherwood: "Death in the Woods"
Anderson, Sherwood: "Hands"
Anonymous: "The Beginning of Wisdom: An Ashanti Folk-Tale"
Atwood, Margaret: "Happy Endings"
Atwood, Margaret: "Rape Fantasies"
Baldwin, James: "Sonny's Blues"
Bambara, Toni Cade: "The Lesson"
Barth, John: "Lost in the Funhouse"
Bierce, Ambrose: "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"
Borges, Jorge Luis: "The End of the Duel"
Carter, Angela: "The Company of Wolves"
Carver, Raymond: "A Small, Good Thing"
Chopin, Kate: "The Story of an Hour"
Crane, Stephan: "The Open Boat"
Danticat, Edwidge: "Night Women"
Erdrich, Louis: "The Red Convertible"
Faulkner, William: "A Rose for Emily"
Gilman, Charlotte Perkins: "The Yellow Wallpaper"
Hawthorne, Nathaniel: "Young Goodman Brown"
Head, Bessie: "Woman from America"
Hemingway, Ernest: "Hills Like White Elephants"
Hurston, Zora Neale: "Spunk"
Jackson, Shirley: "The Lottery"
Jewett, Sarah Orne: "A White Heron"
Johnson, Charles R.: "Menagerie: A Child's Fable"
Kincaid, Jamaica: "Girl"
LeGuin, Ursula K.: "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas"
Mason, Bobbie Ann: "Shiloh"
Melville, Herman: "Bartleby, the Scrivener"
Mukherjee, Bharati: "The Management of Grief"
O'Brien, Tim: "The Things They Carried"
O'Conner, Flannery: "Everything That Rises Must Converge"
O'Conner, Frank: "Guests of the Nation"
Ozick, Cynthia: "The Shawl"
Paley, Grace: "A Conversation with My Father"
Paz, Octavio: "My Life with the Wave"
Silko, Leslie Marmon, "Yellow Woman"
Sontag, Susan: "The Way We Live Now"
Tan, Amy: "Two Kinds"
Toomer, Jean: "Blood-Burning Moon"
Welty, Eudora: "A Worn Path"
Wright, Richard: "The Man Who Was Almost a Man"
Yamamoto, Hisaye: "Wilshire Bus"

Loved some. Hated others. Each made an impression. Each taught me something about how story works. It was a good class.

In Peace,
Michael
mmerriam: (Michael)
All that is left to wrap up my Analyzing Short Stories class is to take the final. I can't request it until I receive my grade for my last submission, which I sent in about ten days ago. It typically takes about 21 days for my submissions to get back to me, which will leave me a little over three weeks to request and complete the final.

I thought I might start reviewing the stories, just to get ahead a little, but once I began, I realized that every one of these stories had stuck with me to the point that I may not really need to review that much. All of these stories - whether I enjoyed them, hated them, or just felt meh about them - have stuck with me, which was the point.

I am also finding myself nodding and going, "Yes, yes indeed, I get what the writer was trying to say/do/show," and while I may not have enjoyed certain stories, I admire each of them, and I am the better as both a reader and writer for having taken this class. What's more, stories that I did not enjoy - or completely understand at the initial reading - I am now looking back on with fondness and understanding. Several of these stories forced me way outside of my comfort zone, which was exactly what I needed.

For those keeping score at home, of the 135 stories in the anthology (The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction: Ann Charters, editor), I read these 45. At some point I plan to read the rest.

Achebe, Chinua: "Civil Peace"
Allende, Isabel: "And of Clay Are We Are Created"
Anderson, Sherwood: "Death in the Woods"
Anderson, Sherwood: "Hands"
Anonymous: "The Beginning of Wisdom: An Ashanti Folk-Tale"
Atwood, Margaret: "Happy Endings"
Atwood, Margaret: "Rape Fantasies"
Baldwin, James: "Sonny's Blues"
Bambara, Toni Cade: "The Lesson"
Barth, John: "Lost in the Funhouse"
Bierce, Ambrose: "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"
Borges, Jorge Luis: "The End of the Duel"
Carter, Angela: "The Company of Wolves"
Carver, Raymond: "A Small, Good Thing"
Chopin, Kate: "The Story of an Hour"
Crane, Stephan: "The Open Boat"
Danticat, Edwidge: "Night Women"
Erdrich, Louis: "The Red Convertible"
Faulkner, William: "A Rose for Emily"
Gilman, Charlotte Perkins: "The Yellow Wallpaper"
Hawthorne, Nathaniel: "Young Goodman Brown"
Head, Bessie: "Woman from America"
Hemingway, Ernest: "Hills Like White Elephants"
Hurston, Zora Neale: "Spunk"
Jackson, Shirley: "The Lottery"
Jewett, Sarah Orne: "A White Heron"
Johnson, Charles R.: "Menagerie: A Child's Fable"
Kincaid, Jamaica: "Girl"
LeGuin, Ursula K.: "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas"
Mason, Bobbie Ann: "Shiloh"
Melville, Herman: "Bartleby, the Scrivener"
Mukherjee, Bharati: "The Management of Grief"
O'Brien, Tim: "The Things They Carried"
O'Conner, Flannery: "Everything That Rises Must Converge"
O'Conner, Frank: "Guests of the Nation"
Ozick, Cynthia: "The Shawl"
Paley, Grace: "A Conversation with My Father"
Paz, Octavio: "My Life with the Wave"
Silko, Leslie Marmon, "Yellow Woman"
Sontag, Susan: "The Way We Live Now"
Tan, Amy: "Two Kinds"
Toomer, Jean: "Blood-Burning Moon"
Welty, Eudora: "A Worn Path"
Wright, Richard: "The Man Who Was Almost a Man"
Yamamoto, Hisaye: "Wilshire Bus"

Loved some. Hated others. Each made an impression. Each taught me something about how story works. It was a good class.

In Peace,
Michael
mmerriam: (Type)
[livejournal.com profile] hilarymoonmurph talks here about putting together a themed reading for next year's Wiscon. I'm one of those nuts who thinks it's never too early to start thinking about those kinds of things, especially since next year will be my first Wiscon. If you are interested in participating, comment to [livejournal.com profile] hilarymoonmurph.

You know you want to.

I am nearing the finish line with my current WiP, which is technically called "Untitled #37" but is "The Dirt-Crawl Story" in my head. A real title will hopefully present itself soon. I suspect another 500 to 1000 words should do it, making the story come in at around 3000 total.

My Independent Distance Learning class is in limbo. The Prof is ill and cannot continue, and The College of Continuing Education sent out an email telling everyone in her IDL classes to stop sending in finished lesson units until they decide what to do. I only have three more lesson units (three quizzes and three short compare and contrast papers) and the final paper to complete, but until they make a decision, I'm loath to continue on.

If nothing else I got a cool anthology of short stories out of this class.

In Peace,
Michael

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